International Students' Translanguaging Practices in a Multilingual Taiwanese University: A Sequential Analysis

Authors

  • Mei-Hsing Tsai National Taiwan University of Science and Technology
  • Ya-ting Chiang National Taiwan University of Science and Technology
  • Chi-Chuan Yang National Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Keywords:

multilingual interactions, translanguaging, intercultural communication, multilingualism

Abstract

This study investigates the use of translanguaging during a task-based language activity conducted in a multilingual context. The participants in this study were Taiwanese students and international students at a university in Taiwan. Adopting the methodology of sequential analysis (e.g., Sacks et al., 1974; Schegloff et al., 2002) to analyze a small corpus of multilinguals’ interactions, we show that multilingual students employed translanguaging practices as a pragmatic strategy to accomplish specific interactional goals. Specifically, the multilingual speakers in this study integrated Mandarin Chinese into English-language conversations in order to explicitly make themselves understood, to express social solidarity and community membership, and to preserve face. This study’s findings speak to the need for a pedagogical language-learning model that directly addresses the needs of multilinguals who learn a local language as an additional language and who may engage in similar multilingual interactions within their own communities of practice.

Author Biographies

Mei-Hsing Tsai, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Mei-Hsing Tsai received her Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from the Pennsylvania State University. In 2021, she joined the faculty of the Department of Applied Foreign Languages at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology. Dr. Tsai primarily teaches graduate-level courses on Multilingualism and Academic Writing, as well as undergraduate-level courses on English writing. Her research interests include sociocultural theory, multilingualism, second language acquisition, and conversation analysis. Her current research project focuses on L2 online peer tutorials, addressing the issues of participation framework, peer interaction, and translanguaging from both sociocultural and conversation analytic perspectives.

Ya-ting Chiang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Ya-ting Chiang received her master’s degree in Applied Linguistics from the University of Edinburgh. She is an adjunct lecturer at the Language Center of National Taiwan University of Science and Technology and teaches undergraduate-level English reading and speaking courses. She is interested in sociolinguistics, intercultural communication, and second language writing. Currently, she works on a research project with a focus on the investigation of L2 writing through tutor-tutee interactions and text revisions.

Chi-Chuan Yang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Chi-Chuan Yang received her Ph.D. in Literacy, Culture, and Language Education from Indiana University at Bloomington. She is an assistant professor at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, where she primarily teaches graduate-level courses on Qualitative Research Methods, and undergraduate-level courses on Critical Literacy. Her research interests focus on critical literacy, multiliteracies, and interdisciplinary education. 

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Published

2023-05-04